Fast Company: how do you onboard your newest hires?

September 2, 2019 Kim Fahey

Starting a new job is a nerve-wracking experience for most people — even seasoned professionals. This is especially true if the company’s onboarding process is outdated, without having been optimized for the modern employee experience.
 
Kimberly Fahey, SVP at Randstad Sourceright, reminds employers that the importance of effective onboarding can’t be overestimated. In Fast Company, she writes that “69% of employees are more likely to stay with a company for three years if they had a positive onboarding experience.”
 
Engaging in HR processes like pre-boarding can significantly reduce stress for the new hire by introducing company policies and orientation topics ahead of time. Having a conversation about “need to know” details like where to park, what to expect the first week and any unwritten rules can help make for a smoother transition.
 
There are other actions that can be taken at the team level to help alleviate Day One jitters. Let your team know to expect the new member and ensure that everyone understands the new hire’s role and responsibilities. Plan for the new hire to have a casual lunch with a few staffers and be sure to check in with them throughout the first week, as well as at other key touchpoints in the weeks ahead.
 
These are just some of the tips you can read in Fahey’s article here.

About the Author

Kim Fahey

A recognized leader in developing trusted and dynamic relationships across a global enterprise. Successful in custom designing talent solutions to help organizations achieve business goals through a smart people strategy.

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